An analysis of the similes in the illiad by homer

Achilles, still angry, refuses.

Iliad Analysis

In Book Twelve we have Polypoetes and Leonteus, defending the gate of the wall to the Greek ships from the invasion of the Trojans. Another attempt of Homer to cast the Trojans in a favorable light. The defenses are brought out to be as long-standing and strong as one of natures most formidable creations, as any Greek would know from the evidence of their existence in such an inhospitable condition as the mountains.

Achilles in his vengeance pushes back the enemy to the banks of the River Xanthus, and so many are the bodies of the Trojans choking the river that at length the god of the river speaks to Achilles, ordering him to cease throwing their bodies into his waters.

Then Patroclus begs that he be allowed to wear the armor of Achilles so that the Greeks will believe their hero fought with them, and Achilles consents. Shortly after Agamemnon dons his armor. While lions and boars are notoriously vicious creatures, sure to raise a hackle or two on a Greek An analysis of the similes in the illiad by homer, and when exercised on Diomedes it brings their ferocity home.

Homer is letting the Trojan army achieve the appearance of gracefulness, while the Greek army is consistently portrayed as predatory animals.

Menelaus is the mightier warrior. This is perhaps an attempt to show the absurdity of the Greek army, changing positions from fleeing to brazenness as flowers are to the field of death. Wise old Nestor adds his voice to that of Odysseus, and the army agrees to stay and fight.

Analysis of Similes in the Illiad Essay

Considering the ability to affect feelings with similes, and the one-sided view of history, Homer could be using similes to guide the reader in the direction of his personal views, as happens with modern day political "spin".

The idea of a king possessing the gall to flaunt this frivolous armor in a situation that calls for something more practical, goes to show the ineptitude of the king of the Acheans.

Only the deformed in mind and body would argue otherwise. The gods, too, ask Achilles to curb his wrath and restore the Trojan warrior to his own people, and so Achilles receives King Priam with respect, grants his request, and agrees to a twelve-day truce that both sides might properly bury and mourn their dead.

Then Odysseus convinces the Achaians that it is far more honorable to remain and conquer Troy. Homer is letting the Trojan army achieve the appearance of gracefulness, while the Greek army is consistently portrayed as predatory animals.

Hera lulls Zeus to sleep, and Poseidon urges Agamemnon to resist the onrush of the Trojans. The method I used for examining these examples is exceptionally difficult.

In the city the body of mighty Hector is also burned and his bones are buried beneath a great mound in the stricken city. Menelaus agrees to these words of his rival, and before the warriors of both sides, and under the eyes of Helen, who is summoned to witness the scene from the walls of Troy, he and Paris begin to fight.

His consistent use of beauty and grace with the Trojans contrasted with the viciousness portrayed in the Greeks is clear.

This simile is packed with phrases that exalt strength, beauty and gracefulness, but little reference to battle prowess, thus presenting Paris as nothing more than a figure-head. It could easily be imagined that throughout time, only great things were heard about the Greeks mettle in war, and that Homer is attempting to balance the scales a bit by romanticizing the Trojan peoples, especially Hector, and bringing to light the lesser-heard tales of Greek stupidity.

It could easily be imagined that throughout time, only great things were heard about the Greeks mettle in war, and that Homer is attempting to balance the scales a bit by romanticizing the Trojan peoples, especially Hector, and bringing to light the lesser-heard tales of Greek stupidity.

He summons all the gods and forbids them to take part in the war. It is also wise to remember that history is written by the winners. The snake, as a notoriously evil incarnation, resembling a rainbow seems foreign. It could easily be imagined that throughout time, only great things were heard about the Greeks mettle in war, and that Homer is attempting to balance the scales a bit by romanticizing the Trojan peoples, especially Hector, and bringing to light the lesser-heard tales of Greek stupidity.

It is also wise to remember that history is written by the winners.

The Iliad: Metaphor Analysis

In Book Four Ajax duels with Simoeisius. An epic simile is an extended simile that may go on for ten, twenty, or more lines and may contain multiple points of comparison. Offering a sacrifice to Zeus, Agamemnon orders the army to prepare itself for the attack.

It is decided that two warriors will steal into the Trojan camp to determine its strength and numbers. In Book Ten Nestor comments on a set of horses that Odysseus is ushering, won by Diomedes through killing some Trojans, that they are "like sunbeams.

The presence of these catalogues in the Iliad is a good example of the way Homer composed his poems on a foundation of historical and literary tradition. Going back, Book Three starts with: The secret lies in the rest of the armor, that it is liberally covered in gold brings home the idea of the splendor and decadence of this armor, as wonderful as might be found on a god in heaven.iliad simile analysis essays In the Iliad, Homer finds a great tool in the simile.

Just by opening the book in a random place the reader is undoubtedly faced with one, or within a few pages. Homer seems to use everyday activities, at least for the audience, his fellow Greeks, in these similes n.

Summary: The Iliad begins with the Trojan War already in progress.

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Greek audiences would have been familiar with the background of the story, and here a brief summary of events is necessary to help the reader to put these events in context. There are fine examples of Homeric simile in Book 2.

In Homer, the beauty of a simile is not always. epic simile a simile is a comparison using like or as. An epic simile is an extended simile that may go on for ten, twenty, or more lines and may contain multiple points of comparison.

epithets a descriptive name or title. An Examination of Similes in the Iliad - and How Homer's Use of Them a Words | 8 Pages. An Examination of Similes in the Iliad - and how Homer's Use of Them Affected the Story In the Iliad, Homer finds a great tool in the simile.

Just by opening the book in a random place the reader is undoubtedly faced with one, or within a few pages. As we have seen in this lesson, an epic simile is an extended simile that compares similar objects using 'like' or 'as' over several lines. Because epic poems were originally shared orally, The Iliad uses the epic simile to help enhance visualization of the reader or listener.

The Iliad is an epic poem and part of the ancient Greek oral tradition. Homer’s audience was an illiterate culture, and Homer himself was .

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An analysis of the similes in the illiad by homer
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